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Two anti-police rioters who participated in a Black Lives Matter protest-turned-riot last summer are expected to be hit with prison sentences of about two years for their participation in the city destruction, including setting fire to two vehicles belonging to the city and state.

Rioters MacKenzie Drechsler and Shakell Sanks admitted on Monday to “their roles in the events that unfolded after a George Floyd/Black Lives Matter rally and march devolved into chaos outside of the Public Safety Building on Exchange Boulevard” in Rochester, New York, according to the Democrat & Chronicle.

One of the destroyed vehicles, a Ford Focus, belonged to the city of Rochester’s Family Crisis Intervention Team and was marked as such. The other vehicle belonged to the New York state attorney general’s Office.

In addition to arson, Drechsler admitted to looting and committing property damage throughout the city, the D&C noted.

The criminals’ are expected to be hit with about two-year sentences, though the judge can lower or add to the 24-33 month prison sentence range: “Dreschler’s sentencing range is 24 to 30 months,” the D&C report said. “But a federal judge is not beholden to the agreement and can sentence her to a prison term shorter or longer than the plea agreement. Sanks agreed to a term in prison of 27 to 33 months.”

Their sentences will be handed down in August.

The D&C reported on the riot and Drechsler and Sanks’ participation:

Events on May 30 “turned violent and resulted in vandalism, damaged property, looting, and fires,” prosecutors said. According to the plea agreements, “A ‘riot’ means a public disturbance involving an act or acts of violence by one or more persons … which shall constitute a clear and present danger” to property or people.

At 6 p.m., Sanks, Dreschler and others lit pieces of fabric on fire and placed them into the gas tank of a car parked across the street from the Public Safety Building. The Ford Focus belonged to the city of Rochester’s Family Crisis Intervention Team and was marked with city logos and city license plates. Twenty minutes after the vehicle was lit on fire, it was a total loss.

Dreschler also set a vehicle belonging to the state Attorney General’s Office on fire. She placed flaming cardboard inside the 2009 Chevrolet Impala and walked away, prosecutors said. That vehicle was also a total loss.

“Following her actions in the burning of the two cars, Drechsler also participated in breaking glass during looting that took place,” prosecutors said. She admitted to taking part in looting and property damage throughout the city.

Dreschler is being held without bail since she’s considered “a danger to the community based on her conduct during the violent protests,” said a press release from U.S. Attorney James P. Kennedy Jr.

“Rioting, the setting of fires, and the destruction of property, however, are not constitutionally protected activities,” the press release added. “They are crimes. The proceedings before Judge Larimer should serve as a reminder to those who commit crimes that when you do so you may ultimately forfeit your most precious constitutional right — your right to liberty.”

The rioting in Rochester last May was not an isolated incident. In September, the city was again destroyed by Black Lives Matter and anti-police rioters protesting the death of Daniel Prude.

Last March, at the height of the coronavirus pandemic, Prude, a black male, interacted with officers from the Rochester Police Department (RPD) after at least two people called 911 about Prude’s behavior and welfare, included Prude’s own brother, Joe Prude.

Police reports indicate Prude was restrained by officers while waiting for the ambulance the cops summoned — video suggests this was done soon after Prude told officers, “Give me your gun, I need it.”

As noted by Forbes, Prude “had been taken to the local hospital for suicidal thoughts about eight hours before his encounter with police on March 22.”

As cops were physically restraining the man for about two minutes, body camera footage and media reports suggest the 41-year-old threw up and lost consciousness. He was reportedly resuscitated on the way to the hospital but likely suffered severe brain damage and was pulled from life support about a week later by his family.

Crime and murder rates have exploded in the city. Subsequently, embattled Democratic Mayor Lovely Warren has proposed a $4.5 million cut to the city’s police department.

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6 Comments
  • mike dar says:

    Two’ for 2 years’… is a test, it is only a test… testing to see if the population will respond one way or another. “2” is a experiment. Designed by those wishing to find out if the ‘2’ will hurt them politically… or not.
    They wish to see if ANY… justice, by current legal definitions, can be applied where they still have a job.. being responsible for upholding current laws.

    Too much ‘resistance’ to the ‘2’ experiment.. only 2 people will be held responsible for 1,000 buildings burned… some of which had people in them.

    Where the demarcation lays is the question… what is… ‘too much resistance’? We can logically expect ‘resistance’ will be apparent from BLM ad Antifa… another riot. The ‘Test’.. will again be applied? or will ‘The resistance” win with zero culpability for more buildings burned?

    This ‘experiment’ is useless if “Practices” are not met, not used, have no effectual reasoning- if the law is not upheld, if Justice afterward is not imposed.

    But we will see.

  • CF

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    Court Rules Gavin Newsom’s 2020 COVID Order Was Unconstitutional, Governor Insists He Was Guided by ‘Science and Data’

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    California Gov. Gavin Newsom got a ruler across the knuckles from a federal appeals court that ruled he went too far wielding his powers when he forced private schools to remain closed as part of his lockdown edicts to address the coronavirus.

    “California’s forced closure of their private schools implicates a right that has long been considered fundamental under the applicable caselaw — the right of parents to control their children’s education and to choose their children’s educational forum,” Judge Daniel Collins of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals wrote for the majority in the ruling on Friday.

    “[T]he private-school Plaintiffs have established that the State’s prohibition on in-person instruction deprives them of a core right that is constitutionally protected,” the court said.

    The ruling noted that this is not the first time California has been heavy-handed in its lockdown orders.

    “As with its rigidly overbroad approach to religious services, California once again failed to ‘explain why it cannot address its legitimate concerns with rules short of a total ban,’” the court said.

    “Because California’s ban on in-person schooling abridges a fundamental liberty of these five Plaintiffs that is protected by the Due Process Clause, that prohibition can be upheld only if it withstands strict scrutiny. Given the State closure order’s lack of narrow tailoring, we cannot say that, as a matter of law, it survives such scrutiny,” it said.

    The appeals court, however, said that it could not offer the same support for parents of public school students who sued over Newsom’s July 2020 order.

    It said that there is nothing in current law that requires the state to offer education in any specific format, and thus the parents lost that part of the lawsuit.

    Newsom insisted its rules were the right action at the right time.

    “Throughout this once-in-a-lifetime pandemic, the state was guided by science and data — prioritizing the health and safety of students, staff, and their families while supporting schools to meet the needs of students and return to in-person learning quickly,” the governor’s office said in a statement. “All students are returning to full, in-person instruction next year, and the state is focused on ensuring that return is successful.”

    Harmeet Dhillon, CEO of the Center for American Liberty, which represented the families suing Newsom, said the ruling is a victory for parents.

    “Today’s opinion from the Ninth Circuit is a huge victory for parents’ rights,” she said. “The Ninth Circuit rightly ruled in parents’ favor, affirming that they — and not Gavin Newsom or faceless bureaucrats — have the right to decide how best to [educate] their children.”

    “While we are thrilled for our clients whose rights are vindicated by today’s decision, we are disappointed the Ninth Circuit did not rule that all students, including those in public school, have a basic right to an education. We will continue to advocate for the educational rights of all students,” Dhillon said.

    When the lawsuit was filed a year ago, one parent said he acted because online education was failing his children, according to NBC News.

    “The negative effects of keeping schools closed far outweigh the risks of opening them,” said Jesse Petrilla, who has two sons.

    When schools first closed in March 2020, he said he noticed a “significant decline in engagement and motivation and enthusiasm for learning” in his children. Petrilla said there is also”worry about long-term effects, psychologically, if the schools remain closed.”

    “Parents should have a choice. Teachers should have a choice. Districts should have a choice,” he said. “The governor is trying to take away that freedom with this order.”

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    Megan Rapinoe Reacts To Backlash, Says Media Needs To ‘Get Better’ With Criticism Of Women’s Sports

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    U.S. women’s soccer team captain Megan Rapinoe said this weekend that the media needs to “get better” with their criticism of women’s athletics, adding that she “always welcome[s] the criticism.”

    Team USA was heavily criticized after being shutout by Sweden 3-0 in their Olympic opener on Wednesday. Notably, Americans online blasted the team for protesting alleged rampant racism in the U.S. in solidarity with radical leftist group Black Lives Matter before kickoff by taking a knee.

    “I know what it is,” Rapinoe said of the criticism, according to Yahoo! Sports. “I’m on social media. I’m not a hermit.”

    “I always welcome the criticism,” the forward added. “For women’s sports, criticism in the media still needs to get better.”

    The criticism, Rapinoe continued, “says to me that people are watching the games and understand the importance of games and understand different teams. I don’t mind that stuff. I think everything they said was right. We didn’t play well. Sweden did get the better of us.”

    “Being in a position where all of my career we are one of the best teams or the best team in the world, if you can’t take that kind of criticism, then you are probably not going to be here that long,” she added

    In other discussions with the press, Rapinoe stood by the team’s kneeling protest at the Olympics.

    “It’s an opportunity for us to continue to use our voices and use our platforms to talk about the things that affect all of us intimately in different ways,” Rapinoe said following the Wednesday game, according to The Associated Press.

    “We have people from Team USA, from all over the country, from all backgrounds, and people literally from all over the world for every other team so I obviously encourage everyone to use that platform to the best of their ability to do the most good that they possibly can in the world, especially as all eyes are on Tokyo these next couple weeks,” she continued.

    “We’re on the global stage, with the world’s media, and eyeballs and people’s attention, all drawn to one place with a collection of incredible athletes from all over the world, who care a lot about what they’re doing here in Tokyo in terms of their sport, and who care a lot about a lot of other things.”

    Last November, members of the soccer team notably wore Black Lives Matter jerseys and kneeled for the national anthem in the Netherlands, again sparking widespread criticism. The Daily Wire reported on the protest:

    “We love our country, and it is a true honor to represent America. It is also our duty to demand that the liberties and freedoms that our country was founded on extend to everyone,” read a statement that members of the team posted on social media before the game, which ended in a 2-0 defeat against the Netherlands.

    “Today, we wear Black Lives Matter to affirm human decency. We protest against racial injustice and police brutality against Black people. We protest against the racist infrastructures that do not provide equal opportunity for Black and brown people to fulfill their dreams, including playing on this team,” the statement continued.

    “As the United States Women’s National team players, we collectively work toward a society where the American ideals are upheld, and Black lives are no longer systematically targeted.”

    “Black Lives Matter,” the statement concluded.

    The women’s team rallied against New Zealand on Saturday with an impressive 6-1 win.

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    First Federal Agency Mandates COVID-19 Vaccine

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    The Department of Veterans Affairs is making COVID-19 vaccination mandatory for health care workers.

    The mandate applies to health care workers who work at or visit Veterans Health Administration facilities as well as to those who supply direct care to people the agency serves, according to a press release.

    Individuals will have eight weeks to get fully vaccinated and that they will get four hours of paid administrative leave after showing that they have been vaccinated.

    “We’re mandating vaccines for Title 38 employees because it’s the best way to keep Veterans safe, especially as the Delta variant spreads across the country,” VA Secretary Denis McDonough said. “Whenever a Veteran or VA employee sets foot in a VA facility, they deserve to know that we have done everything in our power to protect them from COVID-19. With this mandate, we can once again make — and keep — that fundamental promise.”

    The Associated Press noted that it was it was not clear what would happen to VA workers who decline to get vaccinated. The VA said vaccination will be a requirement “absent a medical or religious exemption,” according to the outlet.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 49.1 percent of the U.S. population has been fully vaccinated while 56.8 percent has received at least one dose.

    The Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines both involve receiving two shots while the Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen vaccine involves just one shot.

    So far there have been more than 34.5 million COVID-19 cases in the U.S. and more than 611,000 deaths, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

    The VA noted that four unvaccinated employees have recently passed away from COVID-19 and that at least three of them passed away due to the Delta variant.

    “There has also been an outbreak among unvaccinated employees and trainees at a VA Law Enforcement Training Center, the third such outbreak during the pandemic,” the news release also noted.

    The American Medical Association, American Academy of Pediatrics and dozens of other groups are signatories on a joint statement calling for mandatory vaccinations for health care and long-term care workers.

    “Due to the recent COVID-19 surge and the availability of safe and effective vaccines, our health care organizations and societies advocate that all health care and long-term care employers require their workers to receive the COVID-19 vaccine,” the joint statement declares.

    “While we recognize some workers cannot be vaccinated because of identified medical reasons and should be exempted from a mandate, they constitute a small minority of all workers. Employers should consider any applicable state laws on a case-by-case basis,” the statement notes.

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    WATCH: Biden Snaps at Female Reporter for Asking COVID Vaccine Question He Didn’t Like

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    On Monday while speaking to reporters, President Joe Biden snapped at a female reporter after she asked a question that was not directly related to his meeting with Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi.

    “Mr. President, Veterans Affairs is going to have a mandate for its healthcare–” NBC’s Kelly O’Donnell started to say before Biden rudely interrupted.

    “You are such a pain in the neck, but I’m going to answer your question because we’ve known each other so long,” Biden replied. “It has nothing to do with Iraq.”

    “Yes, Veteran Affairs is going to, in fact, require that all doctors working in their facilities are gonna have to be vaccinated,” Biden continued.

    WATCH:

    Scott Jennings, a CNN political commentator took to Twitter to hammer Biden: “Verbally abusive and dismissive of a female journalist. Keeps happening over and over. Why?”

    Back in June, Biden unleashed on CNN’s Kaitlan Collins while discussing his conversations with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    “Why are you so confident he’ll change his behavior, Mr. President?” Collins asked.

    “I’m not confident he’ll change his behavior,” Biden unleashed. “Where the hell — what do you do all the time? When did I say I was confident?”

    “I said …what I said was, let’s get it straight, I said what will change their behavior is if the rest of the world reacts to them and it diminishes their standing in the world,” he added. “I am not confident of anything. I am just stating the facts.”

    “But given his past behavior has not changed and in that press conference after sitting down with you for several hours, he denied any involvement in cyberattacks. He downplayed human rights abuses. He even refused to say Alexey Navalny’s name,” Collins said. “So how does that account to a constructive meeting, as President Putin put it?”

    “If you don’t understand that, you are in the wrong business,” Biden shot back.

    Biden’s sexist behavior doesn’t end there. During a visit to the Ford plant, Biden joked about running over a female reporter.

    Biden also joked about running over a female reporter earlier this year while he was test driving a Ford truck.

    “Mr. President, can I ask you a quick question on Israel before you drive away since it’s so important?” the reporter asked.

    “No you can’t. Not unless you get in front of the car as I step on it,” Biden replied. “I’m only teasing.”

    WATCH:

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    VIDEO: Thug Beats 68-Year-Old Man Senseless in Broad Daylight. Police Sources Say Victim Refused to Hand over Property.

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    A mugger beat a 68-year-old man senseless in broad daylight on a New York City sidewalk Saturday — and police sources told the New York Post the beatdown commenced after the victim refused to give up his belongings.

    The suspect approached the victim — who was riding a Citi Bike — at 9:05 a.m. on Pitkin Avenue and Barbey Street in Brooklyn, the Post reported.

    Police sources told the paper the suspect patted the victim’s pocket and demanded property from him.

    But police sources told the Post the elderly man refused — and that’s when the brutal beatdown began.

    Surveillance video captured the attacker — dressed in a gray hoodie and gray pants with a white mask — pummeling the victim with lefts and rights against the side of a building.

    At one point the victim’s glasses fly off his face.

    Within seconds, the attacker knocks the victim to the sidewalk and continues delivering blows with his fists and stomps on him for good measure.

    As the thoroughly beaten victim is nearly motionless, the attacker tosses his body around like a rag doll — at one point the back of the victim’s head slams upon the ground.

    The perp rolls the victim over and rifles through his pockets. Then the clip ends.

    Police said the attacker took a cellphone and silver necklace from the victim, the Post reported. Then the perp fled west on Pitkin Avenue, the paper said, citing police souces.

    The victim suffered a broken wrist and nose, the NYPD added.

    It likely will come as no surprise that a leftist has doubts it was a straight-up mugging.

    “It’s hard to believe that the guy in the hoodie just walked up to him and started robbing him,” the commenter offered in response to the NYPD tweet, adding “friendly reminder that we don’t know WHAT was said prior to the attack we’re witnessing.”

    The same user added, “I’ve seen enough videos on the internet of people hurling racial epithets at strangers that led to this type of violence.. I can’t say for sure, but [I] highly doubt this incident went un-agitated.”

    Other users soundly eviscerated the commenter in short order.

    The Post said a police union indicated the beating shows that criminals now control the streets due to recent NYC laws.

    “These are NYC streets! What used to be the safest big city sent back to the days of high crime due to failed laws that allow no consequences and embolden criminals,” the Detectives’ Endowment Association tweeted. “Politicians in Albany and City Hall need to step up now to fix their mistakes and keep New Yorkers safe.”

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